Independence Movements Outline

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Title of the paper: Independence Movements Outline

Thesis: Being separate from England and becoming a new nation was the primary objective of the Declaration of Independence. I The Declaration of Independence A. first continental congress B. second continental congress II. Rights of human being A. natural rights B. a duty of governments C. rights of citizens III. Effects A. liberty B. bill of rights C. toward other countries Conclusion The main point of the declaration of independence is to represent rights of men, and the conduct of being independent inspired in various ways.

Works Cited:

Armitage, David. The Declaration of Independence. A Global History. London, Cambridge: Harvard           University Press, 2007.

Gerber, Scott Douglas. The Declaration of Independence Origins and Impact. Landmark Events in U.S.    History. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2002.

Malone, Dumas, Hirst Milhollen, and Milton Kaplan. The Story of the Declaration of Independence.          Bicentennial Edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 1975.

Declaration of Independence.” Columbia Encyclopedia Sixth edition. 2004. Questia.com. 7 May.2012.

 

Answer

The Independence Movements Outline

Being separate from England and becoming a new nation was the primary objective of the declaration of independence. The British colonialism in the United States faced resentment from the American people. Key political figures and economists saw the poor trend of imperialism in America. There was enormous political and economic jeopardy in America before independence and the colonialists in America also disputed the exploitative trade regulations that the British government imposed on America. The increased demand for independence sparked political tassels between the Americans, Britain and the British colonialists in America. The plea for freedom would be climaxed by the declaration of independence in America in July 1776 being pioneered by a rough draft that was written by Thomas Jefferson. The document came into recognition during George Washington’s tenure as the president of the United States of America. The declaration came in a document that has been widely used in the world to derive declarations of nations’ independence. Other than being a significant, sacred and political document, its structure and model has always been used by emerging nations, judges of the Supreme Court and politicians on a global scale (Gerber 4).

The declaration came to declare thirteen British colonies as United States of America free from the British imperialism. This meant that they could make treaties, economic ties, and peace agreements; they could also declare war against other nations in independently. The declaration traced its roots from the definition of independence itself, and implied the separation of American states from the British imperialism and instigated a nation’s distinctiveness and difference. The declaration nourished an element of exceptionalism for a country created by secession and embraced with vision and mission in the world (Armitage 4).

The attainment of independence did not come easily, neither did it come in a day; it was characterized by a series of independence movements that compelled the Great Britain to relinquish its mandate in the US. There were wars, meetings and restructuring of the thirteen united Britain colonies, examples of these meetings were the first continental congress and the second continental congress. The British economic policy in American colonies sparked a civil rebellion against the British imperialists in America and England. There was also increased pressure from the colonies on Britain as they demanded freedom.

 

The war between Britain and America started in 1775 when Britain sent for destruction of American military stores at Concord. This was followed by siege of Boston which was ended by the arrival of Henry Knox, an American General. American later launched an attack on Canada that led to capturing of Montreal; the siege on the city was maintained by the American forces until the arrival of British reinforcements in after which they retreated to Fort Ticonderoga. The British government authorized a fleet to treat with Americans for peace which they declined. America having declared itself independent in 4th July 1776, General Howe of the British Empire attacked George Washington’s army at Long Island forcing them to retreat to Manhattan. This was followed closely by the defeat of defeat of Washington’s army at Chatterton Hill in October 28, and a storm on a garrison left behind at Manhattan (Questia 2004). Nevertheless, Washington’s climaxed the struggle for independence when he stormed the British garrison at Trenton capturing over 1000 prisoners. However, the struggle continued with America capturing Britain merchant ships and sailors, Spain controlled a high portion of waters around the British Isles, and all this led to weakening of the British empires. The American war of independence from Britain was ended by the Treaty of Paris in 1783 (Questia 2004). This would be followed by the declaration of the United States’ independence by the Great Britain.

The first continental congress took place in Philadelphia in the year 1774. In order to show unity to the Great Britain, the thirteen colonies met sent delegates apart from Georgia. Most of the colonies voiced grievances against Britain; other members were radical enough to seek separation from British rule by this time. In the meeting were some of the eminent personalities in the American Revolution like George Washington, Benjamin Harrison, Richard Brand and Peyton Randolph. The key objective of the congress was to convey the colonies grievances to the king of England and the parliament. It would later be agreed that all the entities were to make due efforts to inform their citizens and the rest of the world of the same. The congress agreed to present the grievances, not as separate entities but through an elected grand Council, this council would be a continental equivalent to the superior English Parliament. It would be resolved later that another meeting scheduled for the following year if England failed to attend to their grievances.

The second continental congress was held in Philadelphia after the redcoats stormed Boston. The aim would be to deliberate how the military would address the military threat posed by Britain. The delegates this time were more than those from the first continental congress. Delegates included Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and the new president of the congress John Hancock. This time it would be decided that the colonies would totally dissociate from the      Great Britain, therefore, declaring total defense of their territories by mid May 1776. A militia would be organized with George Washington as the commander. The militia would be faced with the challenge of combating the strong British army. The congress agreed to print money that would be used to facilitate the creation of a continental army. The army continued with combating efforts against British imperialists. The delegates of the second continental congress were this time regarded wanted for treason. The summer of 1776 was the epitome of the struggle for freedom when a formal declaration of independence is launched at Philadelphia (Armitage 31).

The declaration of independence outlined the rights of human beings indicated that all people should be created equal, and their creator designates them certain rights, among these rights include life, liberty and the right of being happy. It also instigated that in order to pursue the rights, the governments ought to be instituted among men, and it would be the duty of the government to guard the rights of its population. If the government failed, then the citizens had a right to alter or abolish it. The citizens would then have the right to formulate another government that would be based on the principles that would govern their safety and happiness (Armitage 221). The declaration provides for the natural rights.

The declaration of independence had outstanding effects in the United States, and the impacts regard the liberty, bill of rights of the citizens and the sovereignty of other nations apart from the U.S. The declaration reflected liberty in that was symbolic of the states’ devotion to a government of laws, not men. It was a constant reminder of the only valid purpose of these laws – to make a society within which all citizens would enjoy the highest measure of liberty and realize the fullest degree of happiness (Dumas 147).

The declaration of independence in America had a lot of impact on other nation’s political leverage, when the United States declared defense of territories, others nations like Spain also indulged in the struggle for freedom. The statements of freedom and human rights in the document have also formed the basis of many constitutions across nations; judges have been using the declaration as a tool for performance and supreme courts in others nations have been using the statements in the 1776 document. In the declaration, nations across the world found a path to follow to mark emancipation from colonial imperialists.

Conclusion

The main point of the declaration of independence is to represent rights of men, and the conduct of being independent inspired in various ways, that is through execution of rights of liberty, justice before the law natural rights and constitutional rights. The truths held in the declaration of rights are abundantly evident before all people, that all people should be created equal. All men have a right to live, have liberty and do what pleases them, the declaration of independence served a significant role in mitigating imperialism that the British colonialists advanced in the name of civilization. It served to educate other nations on how to approach matters of human rights and justice. Up to date, it remains in the minds of every American the values that hold them together as a nation.

Works Cited

Armitage, David. The Declaration of Independence. A Global History. London: Harvard University Press, 2007.

Gerber, Scott Douglas. The Declaration of Independence Origins and Impact. Landmark Events   in U.S. History. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2002.

Malone, Dumas, Hirst Milhollen, and Milton Kaplan. The Story of the Declaration of        Independence. Bicentennial Edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 1975.

\”Declaration of Independence.\” Columbia Encyclopedia Sixth edition. 2004. Questia.com. 7     May.2012.

 

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